Archive for January, 2012

2012 CC Singapore Meetup #1

The first CC Singapore meetup will be on Friday 10 Feb, 2012.
Venue: HackerSpaceSG (thanks again, folks!)
Time: 7.30pm – 9.30pm
Host: Kanako Honma/ Ivan Chew

Facebook Event page, here. BTW, anyone can attend this event (there’s no “membership” or anything like that). Would appreciate if you could indicate your attendance at the FB page or by leaving a comment. So that we don’t need to turn anyone away due to space constraint. Thanks!

This meetup came about as a result of this discussion about the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA) at the CC Singapore mailing list.

As of this post, the proposed bills have been withdrawn. Mashable.com has posted a timeline of the events that eventually lead to the withdrawal of the bill.

The meetup was organised just before news of the bill’s withdrawal from the US Senate. Still, it remains a relevant topic to be discussed. Always good to understand the wider implications of such proposed bills. Particularly when such bills, even if passed in another country, affects websites that exist outside of it.

Here’s a 4min video that explains the impact of those bills, if they had been passed.

Also, we have Justin’s permission to re-post his explanation about the implications of SOPA and PIPA:

There are lots of misconceptions about SOPA and PIPA. The reason behind these 2 acts is mainly because content producers like Hollywood are losing “potential revenue” due to piracy, and they have come up with various solutions to try and curb that, SOPA and PIPA being some of the more drastic solutions.

The main gist is that content producers like yourself will be able to tell DNS servers to not allow resolving of domain names that infringe copyright. DNS servers reside locally, and they are the backbone of the Internet to translate friendly names like “google.com” into computer numbered addresses like “8.8.8.8”. Since DNS servers reside locally within the country and the jurisdiction is within the country (as opposed to trying to shut down the actual server with infringing content in another country), it allows content producers the ability to potentially stop people within the country from accessing sites that infringe their content.

In layman’s term as a consumer, what this means is that potentially if any content is deemed infringing copyrights, you as a consumer within the country will not be able to access that content anymore. Let’s say Wikipedia infringes content from some media conglomerate or some book written by some guy, these people can just say “Hey, Wikipedia has infringed my copyrighted works, block them from Singapore.” That’s the “dumb-case” scenario, but potentially could happen. Consumers within Singapore will not be able to access content. Think “Great Firewall of China”.

Another view, you as a content producer sometimes require to “mix” content in and might potentially infringe copyrights unintentionally. Your website could potentially be blocked from Singapore and nobody can access that content.

~ Ivan Chew

CC adopter: Habitatnews (Singapore)

Singapore-based ‘Habitatnews’ (habitatnews.nus.edu.sg) is a site dedicated to Natural History, highlighting talks, books, events and issues, in nature, biology and the environment.

The content is licensed under an older CC license, but valid nonetheless.
Habitatnews

The logo is located at the bottom of the site, btw.

Habitatnews

p.s. The HTML code for the CC license can be generated here.