Event report: Creative Commons Joint Seminar with #EDSG


Creative Commons Singapore thanks Ngee Ann Polytechnic Library, for hosting the event, and Mr Preetam Rai for helping with the venue arrangement and providing the images for this article.

The following article was written by Michael Tegos who has released it under a CC-BY-SA license. He can be reached at https://michaeltegos.wordpress.com/.


On 29 May I had the opportunity to attend the joint seminar on Creative Commons at the Ngee Ann Polytechnic Library. It was organized by volunteers from Creative Commons Singapore and educators’ community #edsg. The purpose was to get the discussion going about Creative Commons and its use among educators, and spread awareness on the potential of open source licensing for learning and collaborating purposes.

I’ll admit I wasn’t sure how successful the event would be. Creative Commons is an area that most people seem to ignore, maybe because it seems arcane to them. If it’s not the tech jargon that gets them, it’s the legalese. Which is a shame, because Creative Commons is a way to overcome both barriers, enabling a rich creative and sharing culture.


Turns out I needn’t have worried. I was happy to see the event venue was almost full with people interested in finding out more about CC. More than 50 attendants, mostly from an education background but also some enthusiasts, turned up and sat through the presentations on offer.


Artist and Creative Commons Singapore volunteer Ivan Chew started off the event by covering the basics on Creative Commons. He talked about what the difference is from copyright and fair dealing, and then went to introduce CC and talk about the different licenses available.

NUS’s Chan Hsiao-yun and physics teacher Wee Loo Kang then explained how one can find CC resources across the web and correctly attribute and license them, in order to incorporate them into their work.

Finally, IP lawyer and Creative Commons Singapore volunteer Lam Chung Nian and academic N. Sivasothi discussed the issues arising from using CC content, and addressed questions from the audience in this regard.

Resources for all the presentations can be found at the event site, appropriately licensed under CC!

I feel this is a very positive step in building people’s interest in CC, especially for educators willing to learn more about it and pass that knowledge to their students. Fostering an open-source sharing creative culture amongst young learners is essential to highlighting the impact CC can have on the proliferation of knowledge and creativity. Further events could delve deeper in the issues and use of CC, and help spread awareness in Singapore’s creative community as well.



Joint project with #edsg & Creative Commons Singapore: a seminar on using & adopting Creative Commons in education

Volunteers from CC-SG and #edsg are collaborating to organize a free seminar on Creative Commons.

Event: Creative Commons (CC) in Singapore: Awareness, Value, Utility

Format: Seminar and networking

Target audience: 50 educators, paraeducators, and support staff who wish to use and create resources under CC

Cost: None ($0)

Venue: Ngee Ann Polytechnic Library, Block 1 (Mural Area) [map]

Date: Fri, 29 May 2015

Time: 3.00-5.00pm (one hour seminar, one hour networking)








Basic IP

Introduction to CC

CC-SG: Structure and activities

Ivan Chew (CC-SG public lead)



Finding CC resources

Using and attributing CC resources

Providing CC resources

Chan Hsiao-yun (Academic)

Wee Loo Kang (Education officer)



Panel to initially discuss a CC issue

Address questions and comments from audience

Lam Chung Nian (CC-SG legal lead)

Sivasothi (Academic)

Ashley Tan (Ed Consultant)


Networking: Informal and self-organizing discussions among participants

All participants

2012 CC Singapore Meetup #2, aka “CC 10th Birthday Singapore”

It’s the 10th Birthday of the Creative Commons movement.
CC ten logo

The Creative Commons licence suite was first launched on 16 December 2002. As part of the global celebrations, CC-SG will have our meetup session to celebrate the spirit of CC and network with like-minded people.

The Facebook event page is here.

Friday, 14 December 2012
8pm – 10.30pm
HackerspaceSG, 70A Bussorah Street, Singapore, Singapore 199483

Feel free to email/ tweet/ tell others about this event. While we’ve set the FB event as Invite-Only, that’s more to avoid spamming people. Plus maybe we’d get better traction by having friends to invite friends. Don’t hesitate to come by on 14 Dec. It’ll help us to know how many people to expect so please leave a comment at the FB event page or in this blog post.

BTW, this bunch of guys were at Hackerspace a few weeks ago, preparing a podcast as part of the CC-SG meetup/ 10th Global CC Birthday celebrations. The podcast will be revealed soon :) [UPDATE: Podcast is here]

CC-SG meetup 2012: making the Tech65 podcast special

CC-SG meetup 2012: making the Tech65 podcast special

CC-SG meetup 2012: making the Tech65 podcast special

CC-SG meetup 2012: making the Tech65 podcast special

CC-SG meetup 2012: making the Tech65 podcast special

CC-SG adopter: Pitch Feather

Just spotted Pitch Feather’s first ever CC-licensed track (prior to this, they had four All Rights Reserved tracks on their SoundCloud page – soundcloud.com/pitchfeather)

Jolly Old St. Nicholas by Pitch Feather on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free

They are a 3-person band from Singapore. From their SoundCloud write-up, seems CC would be just right up their alley wrt collaborations:

Pitch Feather is a musical endeavor by three good friends. With elements of indie, folk and rock, we explore and express the values of life through our songs.

We believe people have the power to take charge of their own lives and be free. With this spirit, we compose, record, produce and promote our own music all from our humble studio.

* N O T E *
We are searching for opportunities to collaborate with other music, literal and visual artists. Do drop us a message to say hi! :)

CC-SG adopter: Lucian Teo, Tribolum.com

The blog of Singaporean Lucian Teo, licensed under a CC-BY-NC-SA Singapore 3.0 license:

The weblog of Lucian Teo who resides in Singapore. He is husband to the most beautiful wife, father to the most amazing kidsPhotographerstoryteller, all-round nice guy [citation needed].

He also blogs about Gov2.0, Storytelling, User Experience Design and Social Media at blog.lucianteo.com.


tribolum.com CC license


mrbrown’s CC music remix project 2012

Back in August, one of Singapore’s most recognisable online personality, mrbrown, posted this music remix project on his blog:

the mrbrown show team wrote and performed this love song for Singapore’s 47th birthday. Happy National Day, Singapore!

And to make it more fun, we have included our Garageband source file for you to remix, re-sing, or whatever creative thing you wish to do with our song:

The files are here: http://mrbrwn.co/loveishome

Send us your remix or your version of our song and we will share it on our site! We hope that this will be a song of the people, for the people, by the people. Fun, right?

If you just want to sing along, the instrumental file is here: http://mrbrwn.co/singloveishome

(For non-commercial purposes only blah blah blah copyright belongs to us still. See Creative Commons details below.)

Special thanks to Mr Yeo Wee Han for letting us use his awesome timelapse video footage. All rights to the timelapse footage belong to him. You may remix the song itself, but use of the timelapse footage will require his permission.

Creative Commons License
Love is Home by Lee Kin Mun is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at mrbrown.com.


2012 CC Singapore Meetup #1

The first CC Singapore meetup will be on Friday 10 Feb, 2012.
Venue: HackerSpaceSG (thanks again, folks!)
Time: 7.30pm – 9.30pm
Host: Kanako Honma/ Ivan Chew

Facebook Event page, here. BTW, anyone can attend this event (there’s no “membership” or anything like that). Would appreciate if you could indicate your attendance at the FB page or by leaving a comment. So that we don’t need to turn anyone away due to space constraint. Thanks!

This meetup came about as a result of this discussion about the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA) at the CC Singapore mailing list.

As of this post, the proposed bills have been withdrawn. Mashable.com has posted a timeline of the events that eventually lead to the withdrawal of the bill.

The meetup was organised just before news of the bill’s withdrawal from the US Senate. Still, it remains a relevant topic to be discussed. Always good to understand the wider implications of such proposed bills. Particularly when such bills, even if passed in another country, affects websites that exist outside of it.

Here’s a 4min video that explains the impact of those bills, if they had been passed.

Also, we have Justin’s permission to re-post his explanation about the implications of SOPA and PIPA:

There are lots of misconceptions about SOPA and PIPA. The reason behind these 2 acts is mainly because content producers like Hollywood are losing “potential revenue” due to piracy, and they have come up with various solutions to try and curb that, SOPA and PIPA being some of the more drastic solutions.

The main gist is that content producers like yourself will be able to tell DNS servers to not allow resolving of domain names that infringe copyright. DNS servers reside locally, and they are the backbone of the Internet to translate friendly names like “google.com” into computer numbered addresses like “”. Since DNS servers reside locally within the country and the jurisdiction is within the country (as opposed to trying to shut down the actual server with infringing content in another country), it allows content producers the ability to potentially stop people within the country from accessing sites that infringe their content.

In layman’s term as a consumer, what this means is that potentially if any content is deemed infringing copyrights, you as a consumer within the country will not be able to access that content anymore. Let’s say Wikipedia infringes content from some media conglomerate or some book written by some guy, these people can just say “Hey, Wikipedia has infringed my copyrighted works, block them from Singapore.” That’s the “dumb-case” scenario, but potentially could happen. Consumers within Singapore will not be able to access content. Think “Great Firewall of China”.

Another view, you as a content producer sometimes require to “mix” content in and might potentially infringe copyrights unintentionally. Your website could potentially be blocked from Singapore and nobody can access that content.

~ Ivan Chew


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